Gearing Paths

My WoW project of late has been looking at secondary stats and better ways of eyeballing gear upgrades than using stat weights (read this post for more information on how stat weights are misused). The general idea is to produce a table where players can look up their total secondary ratings to find out how they should be distributed, but in a way that doesn’t result in drastically re-arranging gear & enchants every time they get an upgrade.

As a brief recap, Stat Weights give you the damage gain from adding more of each secondary stat to your current profile. However, players often use these for complete re-arrangements of their current gear which quite often will result in completely different stat weights. Think of it like the Enigmatic world quests for the Kirin Tor: stat weights are all about the next square you step into but players use them to dictate every movement from the start of the puzzle.

To get around this in the past I would essentially make up stat weights that would kind of act like that full puzzle path so that players would end up at roughly the correct secondary rating distribution. Sites like Raidbots or AskMrRobot will simulate multiple gear combinations to return the best profile, but this is only really useful after you’ve acquired the items.

Part of the goal here is to also answer the regular questions about how much of each secondary should someone have at a given gear level, or whether there’s a cap to aim for or stay under. Informal caps can occur when players notice that a stat weight priority for Crit > Haste inverts to become Haste > Crit, but unless there are specific situations like Frost Mages & their shatter crit cap these are mostly caused by how stat weights are used more than anything else.

Gearing Paths

The Gearing Path premise is as follows:

  1. Select a secondary rating interval which will be used as the amount added to secondary stats between each set.
  2. Find the best secondary distribution for a secondary rating total ten times the interval value.
  3. Add your interval value to each secondary stat from the distribution returned in Step 2.
  4. Simulate the four combinations.
  5. Find the best result, then go back to Step 3 with this new distribution
  6. Repeat until you’re satisfied you’ve reached the highest secondary totals possible/practical

My initial data can be found here, using the 7.3.5 build of SimCraft with the default T21 Elemental Shaman profile. I’m running intervals of 500 secondary ratings, with totals from 5000 to 16500. Additional profiles will be generated in the future, hopefully up to 35000 in an effort to confirm this system works consistently.

The biggest difference between the stepwise Gearing Path and the max DPS result in my current dataset is at 14,000 total rating.

Step Max Prev Max Max – Step Max – Prev
Crit 8,000 9,500 8,000 1,500 1,500
Haste 2,000 3,000 3,000 1,000 0
Mastery 3,500 1,000 2,000 -2,500 -1,000
Versatility 500 500 500 0 0
DPS 1,449,282 1,450,247 1,432,805 965 17,442

As you can see, the Step approach was less than 1000 dps behind (0.0665%) the Max value. The Step rating change was to add 500 to Haste, while the Max rating change was to shift 1000 Mastery rating plus the additional 500 into Crit.

The results can be used by players to look at a simple chart and see how they should distribute their secondary stats without re-gemming/enchanting their gear.

Total Secondaries Crit Haste Mastery Versatility
5000 3500 500 500 500
5500 4000 500 500 500
6000 4000 500 1000 500
6500 4500 500 1000 500
7000 5000 500 1000 500
7500 5500 500 1000 500
8000 5500 500 1500 500
8500 5500 500 2000 500
9000 6000 500 2000 500
9500 6000 1000 2000 500
10000 6500 1000 2000 500
10500 7000 1000 2000 500
11000 7000 1000 2500 500
11500 7000 1000 3000 500
12000 7500 1000 3000 500
12500 8000 1000 3000 500
13000 8000 1500 3000 500
13500 8000 1500 3500 500
14000 8000 2000 3500 500
14500 8000 2500 3500 500
15000 8000 3000 3500 500
15500 8500 3000 3500 500
16000 9000 3000 3500 500
16500 9500 3000 3500 500

It still remains to be seen how this varies with talents, but part of the advantage of this approach is that it is easy to produce a new gearing path for different talent configurations. Doing so could also highlight where certain talent combinations may actually be better with different secondary stat priorities, as talents will usually be assessed with the same gearset.

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About binkenstein
I'm a geek, living in Christchurch, New Zealand.

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